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dissabte, 19 de novembre de 2016

El secreto del éxito de los asio-americanos no se debió a la educación sino a la disminución del racismo hacia ellos


For those who doubt that racial resentment lingers in this nation, Asian Americans are a favorite talking point. The argument goes something like this: If “white privilege” is so oppressive — if the United States is so hostile toward its minorities — why do Census figures show that Asian-Americans out-earn everyone?

In a 2014 editorial, conservative commentator Bill O'Reilly pointed out that Asian household incomes were 20 percent higher than white household incomes on average. “So, do we have Asian privilege in America?” he asked. Of course not, he said. The real reason that Asians are “succeeding far more than African-Americans and even more than white Americans” is that “their families are intact and education is paramount,” he said.

This line of reasoning has been with us since at least the 1960s, when it served as a popular rejoinder to the challenges issued by the Civil Rights Movement. Many newspapers printed flattering portraits of Asian Americans in order to cast skepticism on the people marching for economic and social justice.

“At a time when it is being proposed that hundreds of billions be spent to uplift the Negroes and other minorities, the nation’s 300,000 Chinese-Americans are moving ahead on their own,” claimed a 1966 story in the U.S. News and World Report, which noted their “strict discipline” and “traditional virtues.”

To the extent that all myths are rooted in truth, this stereotype of a model minority recognizes a real pattern of Asian upward mobility. A century ago, Asian-Americans were known as laborers of the lowest wage. They were ditch diggers, launderers, miners. Yet over the decades, despite poverty, racial violence, and widespread discrimination, many Asians managed to clamber up the socioeconomic ladder.

Until now, the story of how that happened has been poorly understood.

“The widespread assumption is that Asian Americans came to the United States very disadvantaged, and they wound up advantaged through extraordinary investments in their children’s education,” says Brown University economist Nathaniel Hilger.

But that's not what what really happened, he says.

Hilger recently used old Census records to trace the fortunes of whites, blacks and Asians who were born in California during the early-to-mid 20th century. He finds that educational gains had little to do with how Asian-Americans managed to close the wage gap with whites by the 1970s.

Instead, his research suggests that society simply became less racist toward Asians.
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